The Strengths Blog

 


December 21st, 2014

W is for Doing The Inner Work and Outer Work on The Way To Doing Satisfying Work

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Imagine you are helping a person to find satisfying work. You may be doing this by holding a one-to-one session or by running a career development workshop.

There are many models for helping somebody to do work they love. One approach is to help them to do the inner work and the outer work involved on the way to doing satisfying work.

The Inner Work

This involves the person looking within. They can begin by focusing on their spirit – the things that give them positive energy – their successful style of working and their strengths. They can then focus on what for them will be satisfying work.

The Outer Work

This involves the person looking outside. They can clarify their perfect employers or customers, the challenges these people face and how they can use their strengths to help them to achieve success. They can then, if appropriate, focus on how to do satisfying work and earn a salary.

Let’s assume that you have made clear working contracts with the person or, if you are running a career development workshop, the people in the group.

When I run such workshops, for example, the aim is to provide practical tools that people can use:

To take charge of shaping their future careers.

To build on their strengths.

To find sponsors – customers or employers – who will pay them for doing what they do best.

To help those sponsors to achieve success.

To continue to do satisfying work.

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Let’s explore some of the steps you can take to help a person to do work they enjoy.

You can invite the person
to do the Inner Work

There are many ways to start such a session. One approach is to focus on the person’s spirit and when they feel alive.

When running career development workshops, for example, I often begin by inviting each person to describe the things that give them positive energy. Energy is life. So how can they do more of these things in the future? Here is the exercise.

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This seems a simple exercise, but it can help to reveal a person’s satisfying way of working. This was illustrated several years ago on a career development workshop for a fashion company.

Mary, who worked in the accounts department, described what gave her positive energy. She loved running projects outside work. She said:

“I organised my friend’s wedding reception. Since then I have been asked to organise similar events by several other people.

“I also have a small business selling beauty products. This is doing well and brings in money.

“I like doing projects that have a clear goal, which is maybe why I enjoy studying and working for accountancy qualifications. Reaching the goal gives me great satisfaction.”

Mary and I discussed this pattern. She went on to broach the subject with her manager, who asked if she would be interested in leading a project in the department.

She believed in the project, got the necessary authority and delivered it successfully. Mary has since added project management to her skills in accountancy.

Different people obviously describe different things that give them positive energy. Here are some of the answers they give.

Positive Energy

The things that give me positive energy
in my personal or professional life are:

Encouraging people … Gardening … Listening to the sound of our waterfall … Conducting our local choir … Taking walks by myself … Playing the guitar … Cooking for our family … Caring for our horse … Doing exciting projects at work … Helping people to succeed.

Each of these activities can be explored more deeply. When looking at such a list, it can be useful to ask: “Can you give me an example?”

This can reveal more about the things that give somebody energy. It is then possible to build on these themes and perhaps begin to find a person’s vocation. This leads to the next exercise it is can be useful to give a person.

Successful Style

Everybody has a successful style of working. Clarifying this style is often the clue to them finding their real strengths.

If you wish, you can invite the person to do the exercise called My Successful Style. Here are the instructions.

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The person will probably start by saying something like: “The first project that comes to mind is when I …” They may describe when they studied for a degree, wrote a book, gave a keynote speech, revitalised a team or whatever.

You can help the person to clarify the principles and practical steps they took to achieve success. How to uncover this information?

One approach is to invite the person to describe the venture in great detail. So you may want to ask them some of the following questions.

Let’s start with your motivation. How did the project come about? Did you set the goal yourself or did somebody else offer you the opportunity?

Was it something you felt passionately about or something that matched your values? What was the trigger that made you really want to do the project?

Let’s move on to the actual goal. How early did you clarify the picture of success – the ‘What’? Did it come straight away or later?

If other people were involved, how much input did you have in setting the goal? What were the real results you wanted to achieve? What was your picture of success?

How did you settle on the ‘How’ – the key strategies for achieving success? Did you have freedom, within parameters, regarding how you achieved the goal? How did you map out the journey towards achieving the goal?

Let’s move on to how you performed the work. Did you mainly work by yourself? Did you work with other people?

If you worked with others, what were the characteristics of these people? Did you work for a manager? If so, what were the qualities the manager demonstrated? What went well when working with the colleagues or the manager?

Looking at the work, how did you organise your time? Did you follow a certain daily rhythm? What did you actually do to perform superb work? Did you get some early successes?

How did you check what was and was not working? How did you get support? How did you encourage yourself on the journey? How did you find creative solutions to challenges? How did you keep your manager and other stakeholders informed?

Let’s move on to the actual result. How did you keep working hard to reach the goal? Was there a specific deliverable, a deadline or some element of performance? How did you know when you had achieved the picture of success?

What was the satisfaction you got from reaching the goal? Looking at the project, what were the most fulfilling things?

What did you do well on the project? What could you do better in the future if you were to tackle this kind of project again? Are there any other things you would like to say about the project?

Looking back on each of these projects, can you see any patterns? What do you think is your successful style or working? How can you follow these principles in the future?

One person said: “My pattern is clear. I love building prototypes, but several characteristics stand out.

“First, I must believe the project will improve people’s lives. Second, I want to have lots of in-put into clarifying the ‘What’ – the goal to achieve.

“Third, I like to have lots of autonomy. Fourth, I prefer to be aiming for a specific deadline. Finally, I love to see the prototype having a positive impact on people’s lives.”

People develop, they seldom change. This is particularly so with their successful style. They tend to follow this style even more deeply in the future, even though they may express it through different vehicles.

Strengths

Let’s assume the person has done some exercises to focus on their spirit – the things that give them positive energy – and their successful style.

Those exercises can provide material for helping them to clarify their strengths. You can also help them do this by asking some of the following questions.

What are the deeply satisfying activities in which you deliver As, rather than Bs or Cs? When do you feel in your element – at ease and yet able to excel? What are the activities that give you positive energy – even when you just think about them?

What are the activities in which you see the destination quickly? When do you go ‘A, B … then leap to … Z’? Where do you have a track record of delivering Z?

What are the situations in which you quickly see patterns? Where do you have good personal radar? Where do you seem to know what will happen before it happens?

Where do you make complicated things look simple? What are the situations in which are calm, clear and find creative solutions to challenges?

What are the activities in which you score highly on drive, detail and delivery? Where do you have the equivalent of a photographic memory? Where do you always do the basics and then add the brilliance? Where do you reach the goals by adding that touch of class?

Let’s return to the exercise where you focused on your successful style. Looking at these satisfying projects, can you see any recurring patterns?

Bearing these in mind, what do you think may be your successful style of working? How can you follow your successful style in the future?

What would be your perfect project? What for you would be the most stimulating kind of project, with stimulating people in a stimulating place? How can you find or create such a project?

Here is the exercise that you can help the person to complete.

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There are many other exercises that people can do to explore the inner work. The aim is to help them to clarify the satisfying work they can do that will also help other people to achieve success.

As mentioned earlier, anybody can do work they love. If they want to get funding, however, it calls for positioning what they offer in a way that is attractive to potential customers or employers. This takes us to the next step.

You can invite the person
to do the outer work

This involves the person looking outside. They can clarify their perfect employers or customers, the challenges these people face and how they can use their strengths to help them to achieve success. They can then focus on how to do satisfying work and earn a salary.

You can, if appropriate, invite the person to clarify how they can find sponsors – customers or employers – who will pay them for what they do best.

Sponsors

So how can the person find people who will hire them? If appropriate, you can guide them through the following steps.

You can invite the person to describe their perfect customers.

They can start by identifying the kinds of people with whom they work best. Who are their favourite customers? What makes these people special? What are the characteristics of these people?

If the person mainly works within an organisation, they can think about their ideal employer or manager. What makes it good to work with such employers or managers?

You can invite the person to describe the challenges these people face and the results they must deliver.

Looking at the world from their point of view, what challenges do these potential sponsors face? What are the results they must deliver? What are the kinds of things they will want from a supplier to help them to succeed?

Most employers want to improve the 3 Ps. They want to improve their profits, product quality – including processes and service quality – and people. The person can help an employer or manager to tackle these challenges and achieve the organisation’s goals.

You can invite the person to describe how they can use their strengths to help these people to succeed.

People buy success, not the theory of success. Bearing in mind their strengths, invite the person to describe the specific things they can deliver to help the potential sponsors – customers, employers or manager – to achieve success. You can invite the person to the do the following exercise.

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Satisfying Work

Let’s assume that the person knows how they can use their strengths to help potential sponsors to achieve success. How can they get paid for doing satisfying work?

The first step is to help them to explore their possible options for going forward. Bearing in mind the kinds of work they find satisfying, invite the person to make a map showing the possible roads they can take in the future. Here is the exercise on this theme.

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Different people will obviously choose to take different routes towards doing satisfying work. Here we will explore the following options.

The steps the person can take to do satisfying work with their present employer or by applying for work with another employer.

The steps the person can take to do satisfying work by working as a freelancer.

Let’s begin by exploring the route of the person aiming to do work with an employer.

You can help the person to clarify
their best contribution to an employer

Let’s assume the person has already done the inner work. They know their strengths and the work they find satisfying.

Looking outwards, they know the kinds of employers with whom they work best. Being savvy, they probably know what they can and can’t expect from a particular organisation.

Imagine that the person you are helping has decided to apply for a particular role with an employer. It is vital to show they understand the world from the employer’s point of view. They can then show how they want to contribute towards achieving the employer’s picture of success.

Here is an exercise the person can use to prepare for the interview. It is called My Best Contribution To An Employer. The person can obviously customise this exercise when applying for a specific role.

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You can help the person
to work as a freelancer

Imagine the person is attracted to going the freelance route. They know what they want to offer potential clients, but then comes the thorny part. How to get work?

People buy people and most work comes from our networks. Many people, however, forget the real point about networking.

Real networking is about helping other people
to succeed, it is not about self promotion.

So how to get work? One approach is to go out, give to people and help them to succeed. Sounds crazy? Perhaps, but it often works.

Certainly this was true during the recession. One person said:

“The recession taught me a lot. Like many people, my first reaction was to worry about maintaining an income.

“My second reaction was more interesting. I reframed the situation as an opportunity to help other people.

“Over the years I have built a business as a mentor, but that suddenly became a luxury purchase. Despite funds being cut, I offered my time to meet clients five days a week.

“Mentoring is often about helping people to make good decisions. So my clients and I explored the tough choices they needed to make regarding shaping their future businesses.

“On the practical side, the first aim was to cover my weekly costs, which proved possible.

“After a month or so several clients asked me to do various project work. This included helping teams to complete internal projects, improve customer service and develop new business.

“These projects were funded from the technology and marketing budgets. Previously my work had been paid for by human resources.

“Nowadays my diary is full. But I am concerned about the next possible dip in the market. So it is time to go out and give to people again.”

How can the person give to others? It is important they follow their natural style, rather than force themselves to do cold calling.

They can do things that put a spring in their step. They might want to recommend books, offer to provide a pair of hands or connect like-minded people by putting them in touch with each other.

Like an actor, it’s vital to keep working. They need to do something every day to reach people in their network, but also be patient. It can take time before the right opportunity appears.

At a certain point, however, somebody will say: “How can we take this further?”

The person can then say: “I would love to do the work and help. I wonder, is there any possibility of any funding?”

If appropriate, you can invite the person to do the exercise on the theme of giving to people. This invites them to do the following things.

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There are many ways to help a person to do work they love. One approach is to help them to do the inner work and the outer work on the way to doing satisfying work.

Whichever route you take to help a person, it can be useful to invite them to make an action plan. Below is one type of action plan that people find useful. Each person will, however, adapt this in their own way.

If appropriate, the person can send you their plan. You can then continue to help them along the road to doing satisfying work and achieving their picture of success.

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December 19th, 2014

C is for Common Sense and Compelling Work

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Looking back, when have you done compelling work? You may have felt compelled to encourage other people, pursue a particular project or do some other kind of work.

How did you make the decision to get started? How did you translate your plans into action? How did you encourage yourself to keep working until you reached the goal?

People who feel content often see it as common sense to do work they find compelling. The singer loves to sing, the teacher loves to teach, the gardener loves to garden.

Others may say: “It must take courage to do that.”

People who do such work, however, see it as vital to pursue their labours of love. They focus on what the Gallup Organization describes as:

“The things you cannot help but do.”

Such people recognise that you never retire from your vocation. They believe this is common sense. Why? Because every day they get rewards and feel fulfilled.

If you wish, however, try tackling the exercise on the theme. This invites you do to the following things.

Describe a specific situation in the past when you did compelling work.

Describe the specific things you did then to pursue such work.

Describe the specific benefits that resulted from you doing such work.

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There is a mythology that successful entrepreneurs take risks. When interviewing one such person, however, she explained her view in the following way.

“It made complete sense to pursue the path I took. It would have been a greater risk not to do the work I enjoy.”

“Of course, I do lots prototyping with customers and see what works. Then I embark on the best way forwards.

“It would make no sense for me to do the same repetitious tasks, sitting in the same office and having the same conversations with the same people each day. I would go insane.

“An odd finding comes out when I get asked to do psychometric tests by people who plan to market them to companies.

“They use me as a guinea pig, but time and again the feedback I get is: ‘You need to take more risks’.

“That is probably because I say that I am risk averse, which I am.

“As I mentioned, it would be a greater risk for me to do things that are unsatisfying.

“I need to do stimulating work, otherwise I would go backwards.”

People who do compelling work often have one thing in common. They reached a point in their lives when they chose to focus on doing such work, whether or not they got paid for it.

Different people describe different motivations for taking such a path. Some were motivated by pleasure, some to escape pain, some by a combination of both.

Looking at my own working life, for example, I began by spending six years working in a factory. This acted as a great motivator to get out and eventually find enjoyable work.

Some people who do rewarding work follow relatively predictable career paths. This is particularly so if they specialise in a particular field, such as medicine, the law or other profession.

On the other hand, some pursue Squiggly Careers. Many pioneering people I work with, for example, started their careers in fields that seem unrelated to what they do now.

Looking deeper, however, it is possible to see that many are still pursuing their vocation. They may be expressing it, however, by using different vehicles on the way towards doing valuable work.

Such people see doing such work as common sense. They believe in serving their talent and doing work they find rewarding.

If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe the compelling work – such as the specific kind of work or the specific kind of project – you would like to do in the future.

Describe the specific things you can do to do this compelling work.

Describe the specific benefits – both for you and for other people – of doing this compelling work.

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December 18th, 2014

I is for Trying To Inspire People Rather Than Impress

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“It is always about aiming to inspire other people, it is not about trying to impress. It is always about them, it is not about you.”

Alec Dickson, founder of Voluntary Service Overseas and Community Service Volunteers, continually gave this message during our meetings.

Meeting him during the late 1960s provided the first introduction to what Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi would later call Flow. Alec believed we often do our best work when channelling our talents into serving something greater than ourselves. We are most ourselves when we forget ourselves.

Alec and the other mentors I met during those years added another key point about helping people to shape their future lives.

“Inspiration is vital, but remember that inspiration given from the outside is short lived.

“If you are going to help people, you need to give them something they can use to inspire themselves every day.”

Looking back on your life, can you think of times when you aimed to provide inspiration for others, rather than tried to impress?

You may have done this when encouraging a person, facilitating a coaching session, giving a keynote speech, singing an inspiring song, enabling a team to shape its future, serving a mission or whatever.

If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe a specific situation when you aimed to provide inspiration rather than impress.

Describe the specific things you did then to try to provide inspiration, rather than impress.

Describe the specific outcomes – both the pluses and any minuses – of taking this approach.

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During the past 45 years much of my work has involved trying to pass on practical tools that people can use to inspire themselves and achieve success.

Relatively early on I was fortunate to be introduced to the following except from a quote by Michel de Montaigne.

I have merely made up a bunch of other men’s flowers and provided nothing of my own but the string to bind them.

The string to bind them, of course, related to being able to present knowledge in a way that people could use to achieve their picture of success.

Good educators go beyond providing inspiration. They provide implementation tools that work and enable people to integrate the learning in their daily lives and work.

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Looking back over the years, some of the best work I have been involved with has come when aiming to provide inspiration and practical implementation tools. This has resulted in enabling people to apply the knowledge in their own ways to achieve success.

Some of failures have come from falling into the trap of trying to impress. This has resulted in straining too much and forgetting the true purpose of the work.

Alec believed in providing inspiration, rather than trying to impress. Paradoxically, like many people who embodied this belief, he was quite impressive. Nevertheless, he believed in providing experiences that enabled people to learn how to inspire themselves each day.

If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe a specific situation in the future when you may want to provide people with inspiration rather than try to impress.

Describe the specific things you can do then to provide inspiration.

Describe the specific outcomes – both the pluses and any minuses – that may result from you trying to provide inspiration rather than impress.

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December 17th, 2014

S is for Systems Developing By Focusing On Stability, Stimulation and Success

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Systems have the ability to develop. Some human systems, however, tend to degenerate and move towards entropy.

People who work in organisations, for example, can get frustrated by the system’s reversion to homeostasis. This is the system’s drive to return to its original stage.

This ability can be useful when the human body, for example, works to heal itself. It can prove difficult, however, when people aim to help human systems to implement new ways of tackling challenges.

The failure of many so-called change programmes, for instance, underlines the capacity of systems to return to their original state.

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Systems can develop if they get the right blend of stability and stimulation to produce success.

Stability is vital, but this means following the principles required to deliver the desired results. It does not mean following old processes that do not deliver success.

Systems also need stimulation, because otherwise they can fall into stagnation. They need to harness people’s spirit and creativity in order to achieve compelling goals.

Arnold Toynbee the historian said that civilisations can choose to develop or die. Sometimes they commit suicide, however, by smothering the creative ideas that would help them to thrive.

Looking back, can you recall experiencing or seeing a system that continued to develop? This may have been a family, school, sports team, community, organisation or other group. What did they do right to achieve success?

If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe a system you have experienced or seen that developed successfully.

Describe the specific things people did to make this happen.

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Let’s explore some other ways to shift a system. One approach is to actually create a new system, rather than change an old one.

Imagine you have been given the brief and mandate to rebuild a struggling organisation. There are many ways to make this happen. Sometimes the different approaches can be likened to building a house.

Some people renovate an old house. Some build a new house that is connected to an old house. Some build a new house in a new place.

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Renovating an old house

Revitalising an existing house – or an organisation – can be challenging. Sometimes changing a system meets resistance. Too much time can be spent trying to persuade people, rather than delivering the required results.

It is possible to rebuild an organisation. But you will need to implement the right strategy with the right people in the right way. This may call for many tough decisions along the way.

Building a new house with
a corridor to the old house

Kate Lavender is somebody who has followed this route. She has built many new houses – new ways of doing things – that have been connected to existing organisations.

This has including leading teams that developed new approaches to customer service for companies in the travel, insurance and digital sectors.

Kate often takes the following steps to deliver success. She aims:

To get a clear picture of success and mandate from the Board.

To clarify what had worked best in the company and show respect for its heritage.

To connect the new approach to the existing company by creating some kind of corridor – but developing the new approach separately.

To build the new department, deliver great customer service and show the bottom line results.

To hand-over the department to people whom she coached to run it successfully.

Kate has a track record of making this happen. Sometimes the existing house – the old way of doing things – was then demolished.

Many elements of the cultures she built remain. They continue to serve both their company and their customers. You can discover more about Kate via the following link.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/katila

Building a new
house in a new place

Pioneers often take this route. They go out and build a house – a new business, new idea or new project – on the prairie. Sometimes they find gold; sometimes they go bankrupt.

Such people go beyond having a Big Idea. They move forward through the stages of imagination and implementation to achieve the desired impact.

Combining some
of the approaches

Many of the people I have worked with have combined elements of the first two approaches.

They have built a new house that has delivered success. They have maintained some stability in the meantime, however, by being accountable for ensuring the old house keeps delivering.

People who take this route devote most of their energy to building the new house. Whilst they remain accountable for the old house, they put somebody in charge of maintaining its performance. The successful new house then replaces the old house.

Let’s explore another approach to shifting a system.

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People who thrive in organisations often get the right blend between delivering the scorecard and doing stimulating projects. Such projects need to benefit the organisation and produce success stories.

Maintaining stability by
delivering the scorecard

Every organisation has its own version of a scorecard. This describes the mandatory things that, for example, each team must deliver. Each person will also be given a scorecard. This describes what they must deliver in a specific role.

Some scorecards mainly focus on the ‘What’. They are written in outcome terms and outline the specific results a person must deliver. The person is given freedom, within parameters, regarding how they deliver these results.

Some scorecards are much more detailed. They describe not only the ‘What’, but also have strict controls on the ‘How’. The centre wants to feel more in control – not only of what people deliver, but how they go about it in their daily work.

Doing stimulating projects

People can continue to deliver the scorecard, but they often want to pursue additional stimulating projects. One manager explained their approach to making this happen.

“We deliver the scorecard to keep the centre off our backs. In our market, however, we also need to adopt fresh approaches to helping our customers to succeed.

“Bearing this in mind, I did the following exercise before the start of the financial year. Looking ahead, my team focused on how to do the following three things.

To deliver the scorecard and satisfy our key stakeholders in the company.

To do stimulating projects that would deliver benefits for both the customers and the company.

To translate these projects into success stories that could be published and deliver benefits for the company.

“Each team member clarified the projects they wanted to deliver. Again, it was vital to show how these could benefit the company.

“In practical terms, this also meant passing on some of the other tasks to members of their teams who wanted to prove their worth.

“Eventually we settled on the projects to deliver, the support required and when people would produce the success stories.

“This approach worked. We delivered the mandatory tasks, plus built prototypes that helped to shape the future for our organisation.”

Let’s return to your own work. There are many ways to help a system to develop.

You may want to do this by getting the right blend of stability and stimulation. On the other hand, you may want to build a new system that delivers success. This may or may not be connected to the present system.

If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe the specific system – such as an organisation, team or other group – that you would like to help to develop.

Describe the specific things you can do to help it develop and achieve success.

Describe the specific benefits of helping it to achieve success.

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December 17th, 2014

R is for Rising To The Occasion

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Imagine you are preparing to perform on a special occasion. You may be attending a job interview, making a presentation, playing in a sporting competition or participating in some other event.

How can you aim to do your best on the day? One approach is to relax, rehearse and rise to the occasion. Looking back, can you recall a time when you went through some of these stages?

If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe a specific situation when you chose to relax, rehearse and rise to the occasion.

Describe the specific things you did then to go through these stages.

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Let’s explore each of these steps towards doing fine work. Looking back, when did you relax when preparing for an important event? What did you do to take care of your body and soul?

Different people have different ways of achieving this state. They may sleep, listen to music, walk, mediate, do deep breathing or use other methods.

Don Greene is somebody who helps musicians, dancers, singers and actors to achieve peak performances under pressure. The primary strategy that he teaches is known as Centering.

Don’s approach is both simple and profound. He helps people by passing on knowledge in a matter of fact way that helps them to relax and give fine performances. You can learn more about this approach via the following link.

http://dongreene.com/live/

Don Greene

Looking at your work, when do you mentally rehearse what you are going to do? You may do this before meeting a customer, having a difficult conversation, playing a sport or doing some other activity.

What is your approach to mental rehearsal? The classic route is to start by clarifying the picture of success. If you are going to make a presentation, for example, you may start from the destination and say:

“The specific things I want people to be saying, feeling and thinking after the presentation are …”

Bearing this picture in mind, you may mentally rehearse the key strategies you can follow to achieve success. Sometimes you will do this in great detail, focusing on how to implement particular skills in certain situations.

Doing due diligence, you may then clarify the potential challenges along the way. How can you prevent these difficulties happening? How can you manage these difficulties if, despite your best efforts, they do happen?

Finally you may refocus on the picture of success. Getting it clear in your minds eye, you will then relax and be ready to enter the arena.

There are many ways to do mental rehearsal. Here is one approach.

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Looking back, when have you risen to the occasion? What did you do right then? How can you follow these principles in the future?

One singer I worked with described how she had followed certain guidelines when performing at a particular concert. She explained:

“I had rehearsed in my room and in my mind for many weeks. Then came the day of the performance.

“Getting to the theatre, I went through my usual rituals for centering, which included deep breathing. Moving from the dressing room, I snapped into action and strode onto the stage.

“Forgetting myself, I sank deeply into the music and aimed to serve the song.

“Before I knew it, the song was over and the audience gave rapturous applause. I am not exactly sure what happened, but people said it was the best performance I had ever given.”

Different people aim to do their best in different ways. Peak performers, for example, often pursue some of the following principles to deliver fine work.

They focus on the picture of success.

They return to the present moment and become fully alive and alert.

They follow their chosen principles – the strategies for achieving success – but use their personal radar to check what is actually happening.

They build on the positive things that work and find solutions to any challenges.

They keep pursuing the principles that work and do their best to achieve the picture of success.

You will have your own approach to delivering results on the day. If you wish, try tackling the exercise on this theme. This invites you to do the following things.

Describe a specific situation in the future when you may want to relax, rehearse and rise to the occasion.

Describe the specific things you can do to go through these stages.

Describe the specific benefits of being able to rise to the occasion in this situation.

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